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Posts Tagged ‘Feta Cheese’

This was Little One’s favourite for a very long time in England. I brought it home from Sainsbury’s in Truro one day, just to give it a try. It was gobbled up in a flash. For years I couldn’t pass Sainsbury’s without calling in, to get her Special Salad. In England it is called Moroccan Cous Cous Salad. It has heat from chilli oil, but coolness from feta cheese. A great combination.  

Once we moved to America, poor Little One had to go without, until I was able to reproduce it, as closely as possible.  

This toasted cous cous is from Israel, but is the same product. I found it in the Kosher aisle. 

Here is what I’ve come up with.

Israeli Couscous

Israeli Couscous

 

Little One’s Toasted Cous Cous Salad with Chilli Oil and Feta Cheese


1 packet of Isreali Toasted Cous Cous

1 tin of Chick Peas, (Garbanzo Beans), rinsed

1-2 bunches Green Onions, washed, trimmed, and finely chopped or Purple Salad Onions. We like a lot of fresh onion. 

Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Chilli Oil or Chilli Flakes

Fresh Lemon Juice

1 bunch Flat Leaf Parsley, washed, destemmed, and finely chopped

1 handful Mint, finely chopped

1 small block of Feta Cheese, cut into small cubes, not crumbled. Use more or less according to personal taste

Salt and Pepper 

Soak the cous cous in boiling water, cover, and let stand. It doesn’t need to be cooked. Add less water than recommended as you will want the cous cous to be a bit dry, as you will be adding lemon juice and oil later on.  

Once the water has been absorbed, and the cous cous has cooled, add the chick peas, 2 serving spoons of Extra Virgin Olive Oil, lemon juice to taste, onions, chopped parsley and mint, salt and pepper.

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Drizzle a tiny bit of chilli oil, but go slowly, as it is very potent. Taste for seasoning. This salad absorbs quite a bit of oil and lemon juice, so don’t be afraid, be generous. 

Lastly, add the chopped feta, mixing carefully, so as not to break up the cheese too much.  

Let it stand to allow the flavours to develop, for at least half an hour.  

It is delicious either cold or at room temperature. 

Toasted Cous Cous Salad with Pomegranate Seeds

Toasted Cous Cous Salad with Pomegranate Seeds

I have vegetarian friends who don’t eat diary, so for dinner one night, I made the salad, leaving out the chilli oil and feta cheese, substituting pomegranate seeds.  It looked, and tasted beautiful and is a great, vegan alternative. 

 

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This is another family favourite that doesn’t hang around for long. I ate mine with the golden beets that I brought home from the Farmers’ Market on Saturday. 

Delicious. Easy. Lovely for hot days, summer lunches, and picnics. 

Happy Memorial Day, 

Hug a Veteran, 

Myrtle.

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Ravishing Radishes

Ravishing Radishes

 

I love radishes.  The pepperier the better.  I found these at a local market, and they were so pretty I had to bring them home.  They reminded me of the illustrations from Beatrix Potter’s Tale of Peter Rabbit

Peter enjoying Radishes

Peter enjoying Radishes

They were quite mild.  I had them with sliced cucumber, feta cheese, fresh bread, olives and a drizzle of good olive oil.  I love to eat a Turkish breakfast, with hot, black tea and lemon. 

Whilst looking at some rather attractive, purple radishes today, my local green grocer recommended a black radish. I’ve never had one, and am looking forward to trying it tomorrow. He said that they have a very strong bite.  Can’t wait. 

On a trip to New York last year, a beloved aunt made a small salad of radish greens.  I have been growing radishes, on and off, since childhood, yet never knew that the greens were edible, let alone delicious.  I would urge you to give it a try.  The greens need to be very fresh, obviously, and not too mature, or they will be bitter.  Dressed with good Extra Virgin Olive Oil and fresh Lemon Juice and salt, they were naturally peppery.  Delicious.  

Radishes, very good and very good for you.  

Let’s all eat more radishes. 

Myrtle.

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